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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
distance. >> and i saw soviet union falling apart. i saw russia being totally young country trying to build democracy but also trying to save whatever national wealth was there. it was very difficult to understand. was it just gas, oil, was it rivers and forests, was it a vast, vast country, huge territory but also culture. i represent maybe not such a group of people which talks every day but it was a group of people which always reminded everyone that use your culture, it may be biggest loss you have. of course national resources always, people talk, oh, energy, of course, important important today for everyone in the world. what about culture? we think it's always important to have both. >> yeah and your responsibility is for its culture. >> i do my best and i perform quite often. >> so is your friend vladimir putin responsive to that? >> i think he supports. first of all i done see him often maybe three, four times a year, i have known him for 20 year, long before he was a president. >> in saints petersburg of course. i was rather nonman already then because i lead such an institution.
.s. is exploring with allies and russia for instance, today. as we reported in the "new york times," the administration is communicating through russia to syria against not only using these chemical weapons but against these type of attacks. >> rose: how do you measure the relationship between the united states and russia on this particular question where they have in a sense -- they are very precise about what they say and they say they are opposed to somebody coming into the country. they're not, as they say, wedded to the assad government. >> that's right. they've taken a different position over the last several months in they're not necessarily wedded to that government. however syria remains the largest arms customer for russian weapons exports. the russians use a military base, a naval base on the syrian coast so they were very important in that sense. but russia obviously wants to maintain influence in the middle east and through syria and if they can't do it through assad regime, perhaps another regime that would still be willing to deal with them could be acceptable. >> ro
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
. going to africa and compete with the chinese. i can go to russia and say i can manage the risk-reward equation. so that's where a lot of new consumers are and i would say that is a core competency of a multibusiness big company like g.e. so i'd say it's more than those two but those two are important. >> rose: you once said to me tell me what the global economy will look like and the domestic economy will look like and i can can tell you what g.e. will do. >> uh-huh. >> rose: look ahead to the global economy today and tell me how you see it, where it's going and pra what are the prospects for growth? >> i think the world always revolves around a couple fundamentals. one is where are the people? demographics rule. at times when the u.s. grew the fastest was times when the population was also growing the fastest. so the fact there that there's a billion new consumers joining the middle-class in the next five or ten years, you bet be with them. the second is the cost of materials so basically in in the '90s oil was $15 a barrel for a decade. now it's $80 or $100 or $120. there's a
there was so much going on in the world with the arab spring, with the protests in russia, on wall street that there was something in the air. that we've seen all through this year that some spirit of rebellion, some spirit of rebellion against the establishment and i wanted to try to tap into that. >> rose: tim cook was a finalist was he? >> tim cook came by for an interview last week. part of it was animated by the fact that steve jobs famously bemoan it had fact that he was never person of the year and i thout -- rose: why wn't ? >> well, i guess the timing was never right he thought he was going to be person of the year in 1984. that the computer was going to be the thing of the year and i thought about steve last year but, of course, he died during the year. we've never put a dead person as person of the year before and i didn't think that was a great -- >> rose: so you missed the opportunity so therefore -- >> so therefore i thought -- i wanted people to look at tim cook. he's had an hay maizing year, he's doubled the market cap of apple since steve died. the number ofaches over the
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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